Self driving cars and errors

Fiat Chrysler is also moving quite aggressively in the area of autonomous vehicles, announcing earlier this year the joint development of self-driven minivans with Alphabet’s Google Self-Driving Car Project. The bug bounty program offers between US$150 to $1,500 for a bug, which is small compared to the bounties companies like Google and Facebook offer, but reflects the concern of car companies to secure their cars from hacks as they plan to package more automation and connectivity into the vehicles. The automaker’s FCA US unit has teamed up with Bugcrowd, which offers crowdsourced application security testing, and will also manage the reward payouts depending on the criticality of the product security vulnerability. Bugcrowd claims about 28,000 security researchers on its platform. “We want to encourage independent security researchers to reach out to us and share what they’ve found so that we can fix potential vulnerabilities before they’re an issue for our consumers,” said Titus Melnyk, senior manager for security architecture at FCA US. Under the program, no legal action will be taken nor will law enforcement be asked to investigate researchers participating in the program provided they comply with certain guidelines. These guidelines include providing full details of the vulnerability, including information needed to reproduce and validate the issue by producing a proof of concept. Researchers also have to “make a good faith effort to avoid privacy violations, destruction of data, and interruption or degradation of our services,” and not modify, access, or retain data that does not belong to them. Tesla Motors also introduced a bug bounty program on Bugcrowd, and is currently offering between $25 and $10,000 a bug.

Most of the Radeon RX 480’s boost stems from its use of AMD’s new Polaris GPU cores, which the company’s been teasing for half a year now. The industry’s been stuck using 28nm GPU cores since 2011, with all graphics cards released since then essentially iterating around the same underlying technology as both AMD and Nvidia skipped the 20nm generation. AMD Radeon Polaris embraces both 14nm transistors as well as RX 480 (8GB) advanced “FinFET” technology that make those AMD’s first graphics card shrunk-down transistors even more power-efficient. built around its cutting(Nvidia’s new Pascal GPUs utilize 16nm FinFET edge Polaris GPU delivers big performance and better transistors.) power efficiency for just Moving to 14nm lets AMD cram more technology $200 (4GB version). into its GPUs, too. As you can see in the chart on the next page, the Radeon RX 480 contains 2,304 stream processors, which are AMD’s equivalent to Nvidia’s CUDA cores–though it’s impossible to compare the two radically different architectures in sheer core counts alone. AMD’s previous $200 graphics card, the Radeon R9 380, packed 1,792 stream processors by comparison, and the more powerful Radeon R9 380X contained 2,048. The number of onboard compute units expanded from 28 CUs in the R9 380 to 36 CUs in the RX 480. AMD was also able to crank the RX 480’s clock speeds. The reference Radeon RX 480 boosts up to 1,266MHz out of the box, with a base clock of 1,120MHz. Its predecessors topped out at 970MHz. A big jump in stream processor count paired with a big jump in clock speeds means a big jump in overall performance–which we’ll get to in a bit. (Such a tease!) Team Red supersized the memory in its $200 offering, too. Custom boards should be available now. Considering all the shader processors and RAM that AMD stuffed into this thing, it’s remarkable how small the card’s circuit board actually is, as we mentioned in our visual preview of the RX 480. While this is a full-length card (just under 9.5 inches in order to accommodate the cooling system’s heat sink and single blower-style fan), the PCB itself is only an inch or so longer than the diminutive Radeon Nano, and that card benefits from high-bandwidth memory’s extreme space savings.

The RX 480’s memory chips must be laid out on the board itself. Custom mini-ITX versions of this card could be exciting. The Radeon RX 480 also swipes the Radeon Nano’s and the Radeon Fury X’s sense of style, mimicking their sleek black exterior and prominent Radeon branding, though the RX 480 feels a bit more lightweight and plasticky in hand. But you’ll only hold it in your hand to install it anyway. The Radeon RX 480 looks flat-out stunning– though as with the Nano, there’s no backplate on the reference version. You’ll get stunning visuals out of this thing, too. Polaris supports high dynamic range video via its singular HDMI 2.0b port and trio of DisplayPort 1.3/1.4 connections.